An addition to Pinks Barn

"We live in a conservation area and there are some very specific rules about this sort of thing."

Over 20 years ago we made the decision to build a double garage at the back of Pinks Barn, which would also enable me to have a separate office and we would get to put the cars away. We live in a conservation area and there are some very specific rules about this sort of thing. We had to use old stone and vintage tiles on the roof and so you can see how it involved a big bank loan and complete disarray at the back of the house. 

It is difficult to believe now, and the building is mature and the courtyard garden looking lovely. Little did we know at the time that my business would grow, my administrator would decide to emigrate, and Bill would be diagnosed with cancer the same week as we knew she was leaving. (Why is it life happens that way?) As a result, our double garages became the Cross Stitch Guild Studio and we worked there for over ten years until the whole thing moved to Warrington, where it mow thrives.

Much more recently we knocked down our lean-to conservatory (built between the house and the garages) and built a green oak barn in its place. Those of you who came to stitching classes at Pinks Barn would not recognise the new version which makes me smile every day. As you see from the pictures there was a tremendous amount of work to do but it has really paid off. It is a lovely room with the sunshine in the afternoon and early evenings. Pinks Barn does face north and is a dark house which is perfect for my sampler collection, but we do all need sunshine.

When our family come to stay, the new barn room is the perfect place. I can get weak at the knees when Bill plays piano and my daughter-in-law Starly sings with my daughter Lou and son James adds the base notes… This room really does lend itself to Christmas as well – I promise to take some pictures next time I have decorated the room.

Other Jottings  you might enjoy…

Time for something sweete

Time for something sweete

“These extremely collectable objects originally date from Tudor times – I have been lucky enough to hold and examine Elizabethan examples”